9 Reasons why Finland is craziest country I have visited

I just can’t react on one very funny article I have just read. Maybe because I have read so many articles with same opinions and most of those points vere just weird/interesting/funny to me.

This article made me to react.

Why I chose moomin socks as a picture? Moomins are very typical and after reading a book, I began to like them. And woolen socks? Every time, everywhere. You will realize how useful they are when cold comes.

 

Finns are by far the wierdest from all the Nordics

Well, maybe here she have a point. Finns are weird in their specific and cute way. About the drunkeness I will disagree. Go visit a Czech Republic, especially some of those bad pubs where people drinks whole day.

It is nothing to be proud of, but considering an article form Independent, we obviously have highest alcohol consumption in the world.

Sociopaths? Just because someone is different, it doesn’ t mean he/she is a sociopath. They have just very specific way of doing things. Like a sociopaths have too…

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My friend’s alcohol gifts. Czech alcohol too.

You get a sauna instead of hot tea

Well, I consider it amazing and also quite rare. I am usually not getting immediate invitation in the sauna. More like a coffee offer. Hard times since I am not drinking coffee. Few times I was accepting it because I was just polite or had a mood for something hot and bitter.

By the way, the sauna room is painfully hot only in case it is around 100ºC AND someone says “Lisää löylyä” and pours water on hot rocks. Then it hurts.

Spending only an hour in a sauna? Come on, that is almost not worth visiting. During the sauna parties, my longest sauna visit was around four hours – of course, not whole time inside. I was perfecly rested afterwards.

 

Oh, and you are going to have to be naked

Of course, in a swimsuit it is uncomfortable. In many Czech saunas is even forbidden to wear something when in sauna. Even for a mixed saunas. You normally have a towell or something.

Only moments when this might be weird and uncomfortable is, when you are sitting on a lower bench and you have head in level of a male’s lap. Normally no problem, you are not turning your head. Problem comes when you are talking with your friend on the upper bench and you are turning your head. Is nearly impossible to see what you don’t want to see.

 

And then they make you to jump in an icy lake

First, I have visited Kuusijärvi and its sauna, it is amazing there. Thank to my Finnish friend – I wanted to try savusauna. I also visited their infrasaunas or what it is, but the light was so annoying, heat was weird and I missed smell of the wood so much.

You will jump into the cold water and then you can hardly breathe and it feels like millions of needles were stabbing you. Great. Actually aroud this cooling after sauna, the best was just laying naked on the ice and watch stars or have a snowfight only in a swimsuit. My child dreams came true – swimming and snow at the same time.

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“Careful” ice checking – photo by Marko T.

Finns show no respect for the dangers of ice

Have you ever been ice-skating as a kid? I did many times and we measured safety by amount of people there.

Actually they are paying attention about it. When you have freezing temperatures for a long time, it should be mostly safe.

Less safe I was feeling when we had a race on a frozen lake with about one centimetre of water on top of the ice. Whole week before it was warm. I could feel slight moves of ice, when my friend were ice kicking aroung me.

Much less safe I was feeling when we were going 100 km on ice during night. We started with 1-4 cm of water on ice (we checked ice during the day) and ended after 8 hours with all water completely frozen. When during the day are plus degrees and during night minus degrees, the ice will start to crack very loudly. It is scary when you can see, how the crack will start to appear just below your feet, especially when you move slightly down with the ice.

I was skeptical and nervous, when my friend took me kayaking. That thay we had to pull kayaks into the sea and walked on thin ice. Because I had no possibility to fall through it, we agreed my friend told me to go on the very thin ice, only about 1-2 cm. It took me about 30 second to fall through. Scary, yet efficient way how to learn what to do in this situation.

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Before falling through – photo by Teemu M.

The Finnish language is kind of terrifying

I would like to know your opinion on Czech, since it has super similar accent as Finnish. Truth is, Finnish sounds a bit like when someone is totally drunk. At least at first hearing.

I truly like this language and I started to learn it, despite at first I did not want to. It just seemed to be a good idea. After a year, I regret nothing and still continuing in learning. Mostly by listening, I am lazy person and had no time for it.

What is sometimes terrifying is a way, how some Finnish people can’t pronounce “sh” and “ch” in English which normally sounds just weird. With some words it is starting to be very funny. Especially when they begin to say words how they are written. If you ever heard hell like a Czenglish, this is almost same, but funnier and you are able to listen it without damage (I can’t tell it about Czenglish – I have never heard worse version of English).

 

Finns must be horrible at real sports

I am not really a sport fan, but they are damn good in ice hockey and I bet the are hard rivals for the Czech hockey players.

Considering weird sports, thing called potkukelkka is actually weird, but super funny to try. It is like a schisophrenic scooter. I liked it.

Hiking during winter time and then sitting outside by a fire is nice and crazy thing. It is one of the moments, when Finns are starting to be very sociable people and even total strangers are willing to talk – a lot.

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After 100 km on ice skates and for me “potkukelkka” – photo by Marko T.

Finnish people will get you to say some really dumb things

Before my first arrival to Finland, I was warned many times, that Finnish people are closed, cold and not talkative. I have read it on almost every webpage and even “my” Finnish school told this to us. Probably I have met totally different Finns.

Why would I be asking “How are you” unless I want to know it? Well, I am not a fan of small talks and filling gaps with them or so. Maybe I look like, I like chitchatting but it is probably because I am constantly thinking about something and from time to time, I have urge to share it (one of the reasons why I started this blog).

Maybe we are weird, but even I with my boyfriend can have hours of satisfied silence.

Actually, when I arrived to a Finland for first time I was so happy that all the people are more introverted than I am. Oh, how wrong I was. They are usually more extroverted that me. And very talkative. After that, I am often more Finnish than Finns.

From time to time, I am randomly smiling at people and looking straight in their eyes. Then it is funny, how some are nervous. I actually started to do this in Czech Republic too, but people are much less nervous.

I don’t mind gaps of silence, despite it makes me sometimes feel I did something wrong. I am used that everyone aroud me is leading a conversation, but when talking with a Finn, I actually have space to say something myself. Usual “be silent and listen” does not work well here. From time to time, I am “forced” to lead conversation too. Silent gaps are more comforting than this. Sometimes I am super talkative and then feeling bad, because they have no space for answers – or it looks like that.

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Nothing is better than sleeping outside in -15ºC – photo by Teemu M.

Finland is how Scandinavia turns into Russia

I don’t know about Scandinavia, but Finland is in almost everything totaly different than Russia. Finnish strangers will maybe offer you a coffee, fish and a sauna but Russians are more likely to offer you a hug and few shots of vodka.

 

 

I really do like my Finnish friends. They are amazingly crazy people in an amazingly crazy country. And I still can be naturaly using my “jó” (yes) and “né” (no) because their equivalent sounds same.

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